Category Archives: Oriental Art

A Child is Born

A Child is Born by Mrs. Tun-jou Ku (I-ching Ku). I-ching Ku, was born ca 1915 in Hanchow, China. She was a well-known artist specializing in birds, flowers and Chinese landscapes. She became a professor of Chinese Art at the … Continue reading

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Monkey See, Monkey Do & Kung Hei Fat Choy To You Too!

This year, 2016, sees the welcoming to the Chinese Year of the Monkey (猴), the ninth of the 12-year cycle of animals which appear in the Chinese zodiac calendar. It is  also associated with the Earthly Branch symbol 申. On first hearing of the Year of the … Continue reading

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When in Singapore, you must Sri Mariamann Temple

Sri Mariamman Temple is Singapore’s oldest Dravidian Hindu temple named after its principal deity, Mariamman –  a mother goddess who protects  against diseases in rural south India. Therefore, it is the centre of worship for the majority of South Indian … Continue reading

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Domo, Shintaro Suzuki

The image featured above  is entitled: “Portrait of a City,”  an oil painting by Shintaro Suzuki. Shintaro Suzuki was born in Hachioji, Tokyo in 1895.  He studied oil painting under Seiki Kuroda, who was one of the pioneers of western-style … Continue reading

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There’s more to this cardiologist than meets the eye

According to information on the LaTrobe University site: Singapore-born Professor Yean L. Lim graduated from Monash University with degrees in BMedSc, MBBS and PhD. Professor Lim is a leading cardiologist in the Asia-Pacific region, serving as Permanent Secretary to the … Continue reading

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Thou art the Iris, fair among the fairest

Kōrin Ogata aka Ogata Kōrin was a Japanese painter of the Rinpa school decorative style based on the ancient Japanese painting style of yamato-e during the Edo Period (1603-1867); who were masters of influence for modern Japanese art. Kōrin was the … Continue reading

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Beware of the nightly Tengu

The Tengu – are Japanese mythological human sized, bird-like creatures who are alleged to be dangerous but not always ill-willed spirits of the wilderness, who fly mostly at night. There are two kinds of Tengu: Karasu-Tengu with a short thick bird’s … Continue reading

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Just say – Cixi!

The Empress Dowager Cixi (akaTzu-Hsi) was born into the Manchurian  Yehenara clan, on the 29th November 1835.  She became a powerful and charismatic woman who unofficially, but effectively, controlled the Manchu Qing Dynasty in China for 47 years, from 1861 until her death … Continue reading

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Take me to your Jeepney

I had an hilarious time in the Philippines, using their l0cal method of transport – the Jeepney. These are the most popular means of public transport and are often known for their crowded seating and flamboyant decorations.  Some of the … Continue reading

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Compare the pair #11 – The New Wave of Street Art

I saw this modern day replica of Katsushika Hokusai’s ‘Kangawa-oki Namiura’ or Raging Billows off Kanagawa at the rear of Melbourne’s famous Japanese Hanabishi Restaurant which has been owned by Akio Soga since 1988.  The depiction of the tsunami wave, with … Continue reading

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May the cones of silence grant you your wish

Large spiral cones hanging from Asian  temple ceilings are actually incense cones (aka joss sticks). Apart from the smokiness and heady aroma, these over-hanging cones inside Taoist Temples take a long time to burn. The Chinese word ‘Joss’ means ‘God’ … Continue reading

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