A Sunday in the Country on a De Dion-Bouton

wilhioUn Dimanche à la Campagne aka A Sunday in the Country” was a 1984 French film which depicted life in France, prior to WW1. The plot focussed on Sunday country life, when an old painter would be visited by his son coming from the city with his wife and his three children. Then his daughter arrives who is the antithesis of her brother; being totally unsettled, disorganized and alone. However, the above image reinforces my memories of this movie.

This French poster is attributed to the artist and illustrator Wilhio. It depicts an early De Dion-Bouton vehicle used for the pleasure of motoring. However, motor enthusiasts may note (within this image) the gearshift lever being on the steering column.

De Dion-Bouton (1883-1932) was a French automobile and rail-car manufacturer.  It was founded by the Marquis Jules-Albert De Dion, along with Georges Bouton, and Bouton’s brother-in-law Charles Trépardoux. The inspiration came from De Dion who saw a toy locomotive in a store window in 1881 and asked the toy-maker to build another. Engineers, Bouton and Trépardoux had been working with scientific toys and Trépardoux had dreamed of building a steam car. De Dion, already inspired by steam vehicles had the finance available and so when the three met, the realization came to fruition and De Dion, Bouton et Trépardoux was formed in Paris in 1883.

De Dion-Bouton automobile company, became one of the world’s largest automobile manufacturer’s of its time; known for its quality, reliability, and durability of vehicles.

  • For further information on De Dion Bouton vehicles see Wikipedia’s entry.
  • Image above is from: The Great Cars book.
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