Seventy-Seven (it’s not Sunset Strip)

caline-patouIt is apparently seventy-seven (77) years since the French designer Jean Patou died.  Interestingly, seventy-seven happens to be the smallest positive integer requiring five syllables in English and the number of digits of the 12th perfect number. It is also the number of integer partitions of the number 12, and the atomic number of iridium… and of course…,  who can forget it was part of the theme song, from the TV Series (1958-1964):  “77-Sunset-Strip“.

However, getting back to Jean Patou, (b. 19 August 1880 in Normandy – d. 8 March 1936), let us remember that he was a famous French fashion designer and founder of the Jean Patou brand. In 1912, Patou opened a small dress-making salon called “Maison Parry”.  He became the inventor of knitted swimwear, the tennis skirt and the first designer to popularize the cardigan. In 1925, Patou launched his perfume business with three fragrances created by Henri Alméras. They were: “Huile de Chaldée” (1928);   “Joy,” his most successful heavy floral scent, based on the precious rose and jasmine, that remained the costliest perfume in the world, until the House of Patou introduced “1000” (a heavy, earthy floral perfume, based on the rare osmanthus) in 1972.  He also produced Câline (a wonderful chypre perfume, similar to the much later Diorling by Christian Dior).

There are many people who collect perfume bottles, not only for the uniqueness and artistic creativity of the perfume bottle’s design but also for its contents which brings together a sensual, exquisite, euphoric, hedonic, and sensorial pleasure. For people who are interested in collecting glass bottles, see my Glass page.

Advertisements
This entry was posted in Glass, Perfume Bottles and tagged , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

If you have any comments, please leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s