Ghostbikes that Celebrate the Cycle of Life

ghostbikeA “Ghost Bike” aka “Ghost-Cycle” or “White-Cycle”,  is a bicycle set up as a roadside memorial in a place where a cyclist has been killed or severely injured.  Apart from being a memorial, it is usually intended as a reminder to passing motorists to share the road.

Ghost Bikes are usually junk bicycles painted white;  and sometimes adorned with an attached  placard; locked to a suitable object close to the scene of the accident.

The first recorded “Ghost Bike” was recorded as occurring in St. Louis, Missouri, in 2003. Since then, “Ghost Bikes” and other small and sombre memorials for bicyclists who are killed or hit on the street are memorialised in time.

The example shown above serves in commemoration of the 4th anniversary for John Cornish  who was runned down and killed on Sunday, July 22, 2012 near the Brighton Sea Baths, Melbourne.  Cornish was a triathlon coach at Tri-Alliance. To find out more about “Ghostbikes” see the Ghostbikes website.

I also dedicate this post to “Julian” (2013) who is sadly missed by many of his former friends and colleagues, who will continue to remember and celebrate his eternal Cycle of Life.

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This entry was posted in DarkArt, StillLife and tagged , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

One Response to Ghostbikes that Celebrate the Cycle of Life

  1. I did not know about Ghost Bikes, so thank you.
    There is one I pass daily on a very busy road near where I live. I have no idea who it is for. It is particularly effective at night when it is light up with fairy lights.

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