Summer Nights | Tell Me Moore, Tell Me More

[A Summer Night by Albert Moore, (1890) Walker Art Gallery, Liverpool]

Albert Joseph Moore (4 September 1841 – 25 September 1893) was an English painter known for his depictions of langorous female figures set against the luxury and decadence of the classical world. He was born in York and was the youngest of 14 children. In his childhood he showed an extraordinary love of art. Moore’s first exhibited works were two drawings which he sent to the Royal Academy in 1857 and a year later he became a student at the Academy. From 1858 to 1870, he produced and exhibited many pictures and drawings, and in 1863, he painted a series of wall decorations at Coombe Abbey, the seat of the Earl of Craven.

  • In 1866 he painted The Last Supper and The Feeding of the Five Thousand on the chancel walls of the church of St. Alban’s, in Rochdale and in 1868 A Greek Play, an important panel in tempera for the proscenium of the Queen’s Theatre in Long Acre.

Several of his pictures are now in public collections throughout the United Kingdom including the Tate Gallery, the Victoria and Albert Museum and the British Museum, all in London and at the Walker Art Gallery in Liverpool, to name but a few.

  • Moore was sensitive to the beauty of flowers so much that he could not work in his studio unless he was surrounded by bowls filled with many coloured blooms.
  • In 1890, whilst finishing A Summer Night, Moore fell victim to a malady that within three years would prove fatal and he died at his studio in Spenser Street, Westminster on 25 September 1893.

Summer days drifting away, to uh oh, those Summer Nights!

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